Marine Corps veteran: I’m thankful I wasn’t offered assisted suicide when I was told I was dying three years ago

by J.J. Hanson, Fox News, 30 September 2017

J.J. Hanson is a terminal brain cancer patient, U.S. Marine Corps veteran of Iraq and president of Patients Rights Action Fund.

Assisted suicide laws require a prognosis of six months or less to live, but how can we let our life-and-death decisions rest on these prognoses, when even the most experienced doctors are often wrong? My own experience reveals how tragic that could turn out to be.

We also know from the 2016 Oregon Health Report that in Oregon, which 20 years ago became the first state to make assisted suicide legal, only 4 percent of patients considering ending their lives were referred for psychological evaluation.

Yet a 2008 study, published in the peer-reviewed medical journal The BMJ, revealed that 25 percent of patients requesting assisted suicide suffered from major depressive disorder. These numbers suggest that people with mental illness could well be prescribed a death-too-soon, instead of the treatment they deserve.

Click here to read the full article.