Tag: end of life

Nurses’ unique perspectives on end-of-life choices must be heard

by Taumihau Teremoana, Nursing Review, 1 February 2018 The topic of end-of-life care without fail brings up the “ineffectiveness” or “effectiveness” of our palliative and hospice Services. I would like to weigh in on this argument as a registered nurse who has seen for seven years the direct impact of resourcing on the delivery of patient services…. Read more »

Terry Dunleavy: MPs cannot pass the buck on euthanasia

by Terry Dunleavy, The New Zealand Herald, 29 January 2018 Euthanasia is one issue on which MPs cannot simply just pass the buck to the public. This is an issue which they, and they alone, should decide as a matter of conscience in the spirit of that memorable 1961 debate. Already, euthanasia has been described as… Read more »

‘Death with dignity’ devalues disability

by Mike Volkman, Times Union, 27 November 2017 What does it mean to die with dignity? Or the opposite, what is death without dignity or with indignity? There is no legal definition. It is a phrase people like to use with the hope that it is sufficient and accepted. Remember the bit George Carlin did in… Read more »

No, most people aren’t in severe pain when they die

by Kathy Eagar, Sabina Clapham, and Samuel Allingham, The Conversation, 11 December 2017 Many people fear death partly because of the perception they might suffer increasing pain and other awful symptoms the nearer it gets. There’s often the belief palliative care may not alleviate such pain, leaving many people to die excruciating deaths. But an… Read more »

Care Alliance Welcomes Upcoming Debate on EOLC Bill

Care Alliance Press Release, 13 December 2017 The Care Alliance welcomes the upcoming debate about euthanasia and assisted suicide in New Zealand following the decision by MPs to move David Seymour’s End of Life Choice bill through to Select Committee. “We look forward to a full and robust consultation,” says Care Alliance spokesperson Dr Peter… Read more »

I want to care for people, not kill them

by Dr John Obeid, The Daily Telegraph, 16 November 2017 It is not uncommon for older patients approaching death or other patients who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness to go through a period of distress or depression as they strive to cope with their prognosis, the fear of the unknown and loss of their… Read more »

It’s not all about death: conversations with patients in palliative care

by Matthew Grant, The Conversation, 3 November 2017 Yet working in palliative care involves surprisingly little immediate dying. Yes we work with people who have incurable illnesses, but their prognoses vary between weeks, months and even years. And we see other patients potentially being cured but who experience significant side effects from treatment. Click here… Read more »