Tag: end of life

I want to care for people, not kill them

by Dr John Obeid, The Daily Telegraph, 16 November 2017 It is not uncommon for older patients approaching death or other patients who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness to go through a period of distress or depression as they strive to cope with their prognosis, the fear of the unknown and loss of their… Read more »

It’s not all about death: conversations with patients in palliative care

by Matthew Grant, The Conversation, 3 November 2017 Yet working in palliative care involves surprisingly little immediate dying. Yes we work with people who have incurable illnesses, but their prognoses vary between weeks, months and even years. And we see other patients potentially being cured but who experience significant side effects from treatment. Click here… Read more »

What It’s Like to Learn You’re Going to Die

by Jennie Dear, The Atlantic, 2 November 2017 For many patients with terminal diseases, Coyle has observed, this awareness precipitates a personal crisis. Researchers have given it other names: the crisis of knowledge of death; an existential turning point, or existential plight; ego chill. It usually happens as it did with my mother, close to when… Read more »

Five common myths about palliative care and what the science really say

by Anna Collins, The Conversation, 2 November 2017 Palliative care is delivered by a multidisciplinary team of experts, such as social workers, counsellors, nurses and volunteers, who are trained to respond to the needs of people with serious illness. Palliative care is available at any stage of serious illness. Palliative care can be helpful and is… Read more »

Assisted dying legislation creates different categories of human life

by Emma Dawson, The Age, 16 October 2017 Last month, Go Gentle released a short film designed to be “almost unwatchable” in its re-enactment of a man’s death, his unbearable suffering and that of his family. By relying on this horror show to make their argument, the wealthy, white, middle-aged folk behind Go Gentle are exploiting people’s… Read more »

Legalising assisted dying would be a failure of collective human memory and imagination

by Margaret Somerville, The Guardian, 20 September Margaret Somerville is professor of bioethics in the school of medicine at the University of Notre Dame Australia. If euthanasia were a stone thrown into a pond, pro-euthanasia advocates see only the stone and the immediate splash, not the stone’s antecedents or the widespread ripples it sets off. These… Read more »

“Going Palliative” is Not a Thing

by Staci Mandrola, Pallimed, 18 September 2017 Palliative care is for patients with any prognosis. Palliative care manages distressing symptoms at any stage of life and illness. Palliative care provides social, emotional and spiritual support to patients dealing with serious illness and their families. Palliative care helps patients determine what gives their lives meaning and how… Read more »

Palliative care gave me a better quality of life

by Áilín Quinlan, The Irish Examiner, 14 September 2017 “I was in a very dark place at the time, and up to that point, palliative care to me was synonymous with death and dying,” he [Donal Crowley] recalls. “People think that palliative care is all about dying,” says Ann McAtamney, Assistant Director of Nursing and Palliative Care… Read more »

Why are we so afraid of dementia?

by Peter Kevern, The Conversation, 21 September 2017 Peter Kevern is an Associate Professor in Values in Care, Staffordshire University. There can be no doubt that it is frequently a terrible condition both for the patient and those close to them, robbing everyone of peace, dignity, enjoyment and hope, and crushing the spirits of carers over… Read more »

Former medical association chiefs slam plans for voluntary euthanasia

by Benjamin Preiss, The Age, 20 September 2017 Mr Preiss is Education Reporter for The Age. Now three past Victorian presidents of the Australian Medical Association – Stephen Parnis, Mukesh Haikerwal and Mark Yates – have united on the steps of Parliament to warn that the laws put the state’s most vulnerable patients at risk. They say they… Read more »