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‘No-one is beyond help’: Why euthanasia should never be an option

Danielle Gibbs, Stuff.co.nz, 10 July 2019

We live in a world where things are not perfect. How can we say, “it’s okay for you to die, your life is intolerable” when we don’t always have the means to provide the full support a person needs to live?
We need more support for vulnerable people, such as the disabled and mentally ill, that is based on the individual’s needs. There should not be a set standard…

We need to start thinking that prevention is always better than cure.
We need to tell society that it’s okay to need help. It doesn’t mean you are weak. It means you know your limits and capabilities. Asking for help is a strength.

Read the full article here.

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Disabled man feeling pressured to “ask” for euthanasia

Alex Schadenberg , Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, 21st June 2019

To all those who say that things are working well in Canada, and to all those who say that the law can create a ring-fence around assisted death that protects the disabled, we say, ‘Read this true story’:

“I was contacted by man with a disability, who was telling me how he was feeling pressured to ask for euthanasia. After explaining his concerns he sent me this email comment:
I am living in the advanced stages of quadriplegia, now 33 years along. I am feeling the suggestive influence from my nursing care, regarding euthanasia. They use indirect pressure by speaking about other patients who have chosen the path of assisted death, unsolicited from me. I am worried about Canadian laws, so anti-life, and I don’t ever want to end my life. I didn’t choose when I was born, and I won’t choose when I die. Another thing that concerns me is as these evil laws progress against the vulnerable like myself, when will this newfound right to die become the duty or obligation to die? I can see it coming…

People talk about “freedom, choice and autonomy” without realizing how these concepts only apply to euthanasia in theory. In reality, it is the doctor or nurse practitioner who decides if you should die by euthanasia and many doctors and nurse practitioners judge the equality of people with significant disabilities.”

Read the full article here.

We need to take heed of what is happening in countries like Canada – despite what proponents of assisted death such as Stephanie Green might be saying, all is not well in Canada. We still have a chance not to make the same mistake as Canada. Vote ‘no’ to the End of Life Choice Bill.

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1000 Kiwi doctors sign letter against euthanasia

Simon Collins, NZ Herald / Newstalk ZB, 23rd June 2019

One thousand doctors have signed a letter saying they “want no part in assisted suicide”. They have urged politicians and policy-makers to let them focus on saving lives and care for the dying, rather than taking lives, which they deemed unethical – whether legal or not.

“We believe that crossing the line to intentionally assist a person to die would fundamentally weaken the doctor-patient relationship which is based on trust and respect,” the letter reads.
“We are especially concerned with protecting vulnerable people who can feel they have become a burden to others, and we are committed to supporting those who find their own life situations a heavy burden.”
Finishing, they said: “Doctors are not necessary in the regulation or practice of assisted suicide. They are included only to provide a cloak of medical legitimacy.

Read the full article here.

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The euthanasia debate: Death is not a black-and-white issue

Dr Amanda Landers, Stuff.co.nz, 24th June 2019

In reading social media pages, I have realised there are many misconceptions that have taken root in our community which need weeding out. One of these misconceptions is that euthanasia and withdrawing medical intervention is one and the same.

The answer to bad deaths is not euthanasia. The answer is a better understanding of basic medical ethics, of palliative medicine, of what happens to the body when it is dying, and how to care for  someone at the end of life.

Read the full article here.

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Newshub Nation Interview with anti-euthanasia advocate Vicki Walsh

Vicki Walsh was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer 8 years ago, and has so far defied the predictions. She discusses the effect her prognosis and treatment had on her, as well as how legalised euthanasia could have affected her.

I was actually suffering, I believe, from depression and exhaustion and the shock of finding out you’re dying. All those things were combined. Any one of those things would be quite difficult to deal with, let alone having them all at once.

Read the full article here.

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Disability Commissioner incredibly concerned about the euthanasia bill in New Zealand

Euthanasia is legal in Canada and a visiting expert says its very patient-driven, but our Disability Commissioner is concerned the Bill doesn’t protect the most vulnerable. Watch the debate from TV1, Breakfast, here:

The euthanasia debate is heating up as the End Of Life Choice Bill has its second reading in Parliament.

The euthanasia debate is heating up as the End Of Life Choice Bill has its second reading in Parliament. Euthanasia is legal in Canada and a visiting expert says its very patient-driven, but our Disability Commissioner is concerned the Bill doesn't protect the most vulnerable.

Posted by Breakfast on Sunday, 23 June 2019
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Why I changed my mind on euthanasia

By Chris Ford, Newsroom, May 27 2019

Chris Ford explains why he’s now firmly in the ‘no’ camp on the voluntary euthanasia legislation.

The way in which society views disabled people is still largely negative and any introduction of euthanasia laws might further diminish our standing in the eyes of wider New Zealand society.

Wouldn’t the legislation be an effective weapon in a time of economic austerity when spending on social services would be even tighter than it is now? One could imagine that deeper future cuts to health and disability services, for example, would see many more disabled people placed under even greater pressure by both government and wider society to feel worthless and a burden.

Read the full article here.

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Claire Freeman’s incredible story

In a powerful interview on TVNZ Sunday, Claire Freeman describes the car accident that left her paralysed as a teenager and how, after multiple suicide attempts, she received medical advice to pursue assisted suicide overseas.

Had assisted suicide been available in NZ, Claire says it’s likely she would have taken her life. Claire has now turned her life around and she’s determined to save the lives of other vulnerable people.

Watch the interview here.

You can learn more about Claire and her eligibility under the End of Life Choice Bill at www.defendnz.co.nz/claire

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Debating the End of Life Choice Bill and its implications in New Zealand

Click this link to watch the debate

SUPPORT: David Seymour and Gabe Rijpma

“We need to think about that in the context of those who do not have a voice. Who may not be here… People who are trapped in bodies that no longer function… This is about dignity…It’s about giving people the dignity and ability to make their own choice.” – Gabe Rijpma

OPPOSITION: Rt Hon Sir Bill English, Dr Kate Grundy

“A friend of mine in Canada who works in this field…was telling us that patients in hospitals, older patients, really sick patients, are now starting to refuse drugs for two completely contradictory reasons. One is, they are worried that if they take the drug, say significant pain killers, that they will be regarded as losing capacity and therefore not be able to choose euthanasia. The other reason is the opposite. They are worried the doctor might be giving a drug that’s going to kill them.” – Sir Bill English

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Palliative care experts say euthanasia goes against core belief that death and dying are ‘natural part of life’

by Hawke’s Bay Today, 19 May 2018

We don’t talk enough about dying and we need to change that. We think it would help if people knew a bit more about the actual process of dying and what to expect
We suspect a lot of the current debate is fueled by fear of the unknown, and a lack of information about what care is available and what actually happens when someone dies.

“In our experience a good safe death is peaceful, dignified and a natural process.

“People advocating for a law change talk about choice, compassion, and dignity, as if euthanasia were the only way to achieve these things. But these are the founding tenets of Hospice services: you can have choice, compassion, and dignity at the end of your life, and you don’t have to kill yourself for them, or have someone kill you to achieve this.”

  • Click here to read the full article.