Homepage, News

The euthanasia debate: Death is not a black-and-white issue

Dr Amanda Landers, Stuff.co.nz, 24th June 2019

In reading social media pages, I have realised there are many misconceptions that have taken root in our community which need weeding out. One of these misconceptions is that euthanasia and withdrawing medical intervention is one and the same.

The answer to bad deaths is not euthanasia. The answer is a better understanding of basic medical ethics, of palliative medicine, of what happens to the body when it is dying, and how to care for  someone at the end of life.

Read the full article here.

Homepage, News

We can’t let voluntary assisted dying negate our commitment to the ill

Natasha Michael, The Age, 22 May 2019

Palliative care doctor Natasha Michael discusses how euthanasia will impact palliative care from her personal experience with death, patients and palliative care.

The introduction of the voluntary assisted dying legislation in Victoria on June 19 will remind us of the occasional failure of medicine. Healthcare was designed with disease in mind, not people. The legislation introduces three major threats to healthcare: validating suicide as an acceptable choice; accepting substandard medical care by supporting the lack of rigour in defining eligibility; and finally, introducing into the healthcare curriculum the intentional ending of life as acceptable medical treatment. Hereby, a new generation of healthcare professionals abdicate their commitment to the sick.

For the patient, the convolutions of modern medicine, the uncertainty of therapeutics, the conundrum of multiple doctors across multiple sites bring an uncertain horizon and instil existential anguish. Their journey of illness is ultimately alienating and lonely. For many, it is the desperation for the restoration of dignity and the return of normality that drives the desire for death: “I want to die, let me die.” Not: “Kill me.”

Read full article here.
Homepage, News

Palliative care experts say euthanasia not the answer

Nick Butterly, The West Australian, 25 May 2019

Douglas Bridge — regarded as the leading palliative care expert in WA — said the introduction of laws allowing euthanasia would pose a huge ethical problem for medical professionals.

“Euthanasia and assisted suicide are not medical treatments and most emphatically not part of palliative care.”

“We reaffirm our commitment to our patients: we will continue to care for you to the best of our ability, guided by your choices, but we will not kill you,” Dr Bridge said.

Read the article here.
Homepage, News

Palliative care experts say euthanasia goes against core belief that death and dying are ‘natural part of life’

by Hawke’s Bay Today, 19 May 2018

We don’t talk enough about dying and we need to change that. We think it would help if people knew a bit more about the actual process of dying and what to expect
We suspect a lot of the current debate is fueled by fear of the unknown, and a lack of information about what care is available and what actually happens when someone dies.

“In our experience a good safe death is peaceful, dignified and a natural process.

“People advocating for a law change talk about choice, compassion, and dignity, as if euthanasia were the only way to achieve these things. But these are the founding tenets of Hospice services: you can have choice, compassion, and dignity at the end of your life, and you don’t have to kill yourself for them, or have someone kill you to achieve this.”

  • Click here to read the full article.

 

Homepage, News

Being exquisitely careful…

by Henry Cooke, Stuff, 22 May 2018

Tawa doctor and chair of the Health Professionals Alliance Catherine Hallagan submitted strongly against the bill.

“It is a bad bill that cannot be fixed,” Hallagan said.

She said doctors and other health professionals did not want the law. No safeguards built into the law would be sufficient to make sure patients were not being coerced into choosing death by family or others.

“Doctors cannot prove that coercion does not exist,” Hallagan.

Sinead Donnelly, a palliative care doctor, agreed with Hallagan, saying coercion would be impossible to avoid.

“We have no doubt that coercion occurs in daily life. The older, the mentally ill, the frail, are more susceptible to coercion, which can be extremely subtle,” Donnelly said.

  • Click here to read the full article.
Homepage, News

Pediatric palliative care: living with hope and quality throughout illness

by Amanda Alladin, Miami Herald, 24 April 2018

Pediatric palliative care is a specialty that aims primarily to relieve the burden of suffering for children and families living with any chronic, complex or critical illness. Although we tend to equate suffering only with physical pain, suffering can take many different forms.

Pediatric palliative specialists seek to provide an extra layer of support for these families struggling to cope with their child’s illness by addressing the many different forms that coping can take, assisting them through the difficult decision making and, at the same time, focusing on symptom management to improve quality of life.

  • Click here to read the full article.

 

Homepage, News

Euthanasia Bill risks are too great – expert

by Emma Jolliff, Newshub, 27 April 2018

Anyone who claims assisted dying already happens in New Zealand is peddling fake news, a palliative care expert says.

A panel of specialists says the End of Life Bill going through Parliament is dangerous and the burden on doctors to assist a patient to die is too great.

  • Click here to read the full article.

 

Homepage, News

Euthanasia bill ‘dangerous’ – Palliative care workers

by Emma Hatton, Radio New Zealand, 27 April 2018

The Netherlands, Belgium and Canada are some of the countries where euthanasia has been legalised.

But, Professor MacLeod said there was no place yet, where the law provided absolute safety to those who were vulnerable.

“There is no jurisdiction anywhere across the world that has produced a law that is safe – there have been cracks in all of them.”

Te Omanga Hospice medical director, Ian Gwynne-Robson, said one issue for the sector was ensuring it had enough experienced doctors.

He said if euthanasia was an option, inexperienced doctors may offer it as the best option, when this might not be the case.

  • Click here to read the full article.
Homepage, News

Comfort care, palliative care, hospice care explained after Barbara Bush’s death

by Nicole Villalpando, austin360, 18 April 2018

Choosing comfort care means that you are choosing treatment for comfort instead of a cure. If you had a disease like cancer, you would be deciding that you are no longer going to pursue chemotherapy or radiation treatments.

Instead of curative treatments, doctors focus on treatments to provide a good quality of life. “You’re forgoing life-extending treatments,” she says. 

People often confuse comfort care with hospice care or palliative care.

  • Click here to read the full article.

 

Homepage, News

She spent her working life caring for patients who were dying. Now she’s one of them

by Jessica Long, Stuff, 30 March 2018

She says talking about her journey through Mary Potter Hospice is a final service to her community. Without palliative care, she expects she would have been “completely lost”.

“To me, hospice care is about very holistic care. It’s not a number or person in front of you that gets diagnosed. It’s an entire family and their community. 

“I felt very ready to cope with things because of that [support]. To accept death and dying as a part of life.

“It’s really uplifting.”

  • Click here to read the full article.