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Expert letter highlights risk of assisted dying increasing suicides​

Mental Health experts and researchers have written an open letter to MPs highlighting the risk of assisted dying increasing suicides. 

In the press release, spokesperson Dion Howard “says he has first-hand experience of his young clients using the same justifications for their suicidal inclinations as euthanasia advocates.”

“We feel a professional responsibility to present overseas statistical evidence regarding the relationship between assisted dying and suicide rates, the evidence is not conclusive because no-one has yet done the research and it is complex, but there is suggestive evidence which indicates that, over time, as the rates of assisted dying increase, there is a corresponding increase in suicide rates.”

“It’s a critical issue here in New Zealand because we have some of the highest suicide rates in the world, particularly for Māori, and they are still rising.”

The group want MPs to wait until more research is done before considering a law change.

“It is too risky to legislate for euthanasia or assisted suicide in New Zealand until evidence can show there’s no causal effect on New Zealand’s already high suicide levels.”

Read the letter here, and the press release here.

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Newshub Nation Interview with anti-euthanasia advocate Vicki Walsh

Vicki Walsh was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer 8 years ago, and has so far defied the predictions. She discusses the effect her prognosis and treatment had on her, as well as how legalised euthanasia could have affected her.

I was actually suffering, I believe, from depression and exhaustion and the shock of finding out you’re dying. All those things were combined. Any one of those things would be quite difficult to deal with, let alone having them all at once.

Read the article here.

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Claire Freeman’s incredible story

In a powerful interview on TVNZ Sunday, Claire Freeman describes the car accident that left her paralysed as a teenager and how, after multiple suicide attempts, she received medical advice to pursue assisted suicide overseas.

Had assisted suicide been available in NZ, Claire says it’s likely she would have taken her life. Claire has now turned her life around and she’s determined to save the lives of other vulnerable people.

Watch the interview here.

You can learn more about Claire and her eligibility under the End of Life Choice Bill at www.defendnz.co.nz/claire

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The dangerous ideology of ‘rational suicide’

by Michael Cook, MercatorNet, 11 May 2018

Although Dr Goodall was healthy enough, considering his age, he did not seem well supported in day-to-day life. The turning point for him seemed to be a fall in his one-bedroom flat. Although he did not break any bones, he was unable to get up from the floor and remained there for two days. Two days without visitors, not even relatives? Something was wrong.

Although the extensive media coverage about his decision focused on airport hugs from his grandsons, Goodall’s family life must have been less than satisfactory. He had been through three marriages. None of his four children and 12 grandchildren accompanied him on his trip to Switzerland. Instead, his travelling companion was the West Australian coordinator of Exit.

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Dr John Fox: Assisted dying is not the right cure for suffering

by Dr John Fox, The New Zealand Herald, 31 January 2018

It is only disabled people who seem to be a category we cannot support; only the end of life as a society we cannot face. Because here is the reality: legalising euthanasia under the model on the table now does not simply apply to hard cases like Mr Rope’s father, people with strong minds and wills who know what they want.

To include not only the terminally ill, but people with incurable and severe conditions means me, and the vast majority of disabled people.

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The Contagion of Euthanasia and the Corruption of Compassion

by Arthur Goldberg and Shimon Cowen, The Public Discourse, 11 September 2017

Mr Goldberg is Co-Director of the American-based Jewish Institute for Global Awareness. Mr Cowen is Director of the Institute for Judaism and Civilization in Melbourne, Australia.

Humans do not live in isolation. The more our culture sends messages that some lives are less valuable than others, the more some people will internalize messages to end their lives. A psychological contagion of suicide is unleashed by euthanasia and assisted suicide laws. Condoning suicide in one circumstance implicitly condones it across the board. The wrong of suicide is no longer absolute: death is made a reasonable—even the expected—response to pain, misfortune, and sadness.

Click here to read the full article.

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Narelle Henson: Complex matters of life and death

by Narelle Henson, Waikato Times, 15 September 2017

In fact, ACT’s David Seymour dismissed O’Connor’s claim using the example of suicidal young people, a group we are rightly fighting desperately to save in New Zealand. But in Belgium where euthanasia is legal, a suicidal young woman won the right to euthanasia. Why? Because the courts agree that death is a reasonable and good response to suffering – physical or mental.

When compassion means allowing some to choose death to relieve suffering, how can it also mean convincing others to live through it?

If we cannot answer these questions, then surely, we have to face the fact that what we are fighting with one hand, we are feeding with the other.

Click here to read the full article.

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Dutch right-to-die group confirms elder abuse risk – but doesn’t seem to care

by Paul Russell, MercatorNet, 5 September 2017

Paul Russell is director of HOPE: preventing euthanasia & assisted suicide, which is based in Australia.

In recent years the discussion about ‘life ending actions’ has turned to assisted suicide for ‘completed life’; where a person over a certain age may declare that they wish to end their lives even though they may have no serious medical issues.

The Co-operative Last Will organisation is frank about the possible collateral damage: “The Cooperative Last Will and its members (3,500 people) point out the existence and functioning of the new drug. The club realizes that it involves the risks. An extreme consequence could be that children give the means to their old and wealthy parents because they want to claim their inheritance.”

Robbing oneself of life is suicide – elder abuse to death is murder. But who would ever know.

Click here to read the full article.